European Journalism

One of the few globally devoted to the study of the concepts and aspects of European Journalism, the pathway focuses on the role of news media and journalism in the emergence of a European public sphere. Combining a cross-national comparative approach to European journalistic and news cultures with a hands-on coverage of current European issues, the pathway aims to provide students and journalists with tools that will increase awareness of the interrelated and multidimensional problems/challenges faced in the European Union, exploring the new opportunities and challenges of journalism practices and coverage as well on the European Union, its institutions, and policies.

Learning Objectives

  • Appreciation of the variety of European journalistic cultures and the heterogeneity of the European media landscape
  • Understanding of the challenges faced by the emergence of a European journalism and a European public sphere
  • Awareness of the rise of ‘Europe’ as a distinctive issue area
  • Acquisition of key investigative, analytical, and reporting skills regarding the covering of issues from a European, rather than national, point of view

Program Details

Digital Media, Communication and Journalism is a full-time (90 ECTS) English language Master’s program, the first of its kind among Greek public Universities. Designed to combine practice-based learning with sustained theoretical reflection, the intensive 12 months post-graduate program includes two course semesters and a third one, dedicated to the research and writing of a Thesis.

Program Structure

The structure of the program has been designed with a view to combine in-depth specialization with students’ freedom to select a set of courses that best matches their research and professional interests.

For the successful completion of each pathway students must:

  • Take the core course of the preferred pathway
  • Select at least 3 electives offered in the preferred pathway
  • Select up to 2 electives offered by the other two pathways
  • Complete a dissertation on a topic related to the subject areas covered by the preferred pathway.

 

Semester Courses Description ECTS
1st 3 courses 1 core course (10 ECTS) and 2 electives (20 ECTS) 1 of which can be from another pathway 30
2nd 3 courses 3 electives 1 of which can be from another pathway 30
1st and 2nd Semester Credits 60
3rd Dissertation 30
Total Credits 90

Core Course

EUJ 201 | Concepts and Aspects of European Journalism

Semester: A
ECTS: 10

Course Description This course examines contemporary concepts and aspects of journalism in a ‘European’ context. ‘European journalism’ in this sense is understood and explored as a practice that covers political, economic and social issues explicitly from a ‘European’ rather than a ‘local’ and ‘national’ perspective. Bearing that in mind, the aim of the course is to explore the role of journalism in the context of European interdependence and integration – the process whereby Europe’s countries formally coordinate their laws, economies and policies-, and in so doing, discuss the limits, opportunities and challenges of journalism practices and media coverage on the European Union, its institutions and policies. Course Objectives Analyze the concept and aspect of ‘European Journalism’ Understand the main theory and practice of ‘European Journalism’. Examine the importance of ‘European Journalism’ in European Integration Provide an insight on how journalism has responded to the transformation of politics and economics as a result of the advancement of European integration and enlargement Examine the dilemmas and obstacles of ‘European Journalism’ Learning outcomes Upon successful completion of the course students will be able to: Critically understand the mainstream media coverage of Europe Define the core concepts and aspects of ‘European Journalism’ Understand how ‘European Journalism’ can facilitate the transformation of local and national practices and norms of journalism, contributing to the development of a European public sphere Develop tools through which they can better appreciate their local contexts through the prism of a European narrative of journalistic practices Help the audience and citizens understand why ‘European Journalism’ is desirable as European societies are becoming more complex and political institutions like the European Union are expected to do more and more.  Class and learning activities Lectures, workshops, group-work, class presentations, literature study and written assignments. Workload Type of work Description Hours Lectures Ten 3-hours lectures 30 Independent study Study of compulsory and optional literature 50 Exercises and Presentations To be discussed and decided with the tutor of the course 100 Written assignments To be discussed and decided with the tutor of the course 120 Total workload 300  Assessment Type of assessment Learning outcome Impact on final grade Date of assessment Written assignment 1-5 60% 13th-15th week Presentations 1-5 20% 11th– 13th week Exercises 1-5 20% Regularly Bibliography – required reading AIM Research Consortium (2006) Understanding the Logic of EU Reporting in Mass Media: Analysis of EU Media Coverage and Interviews in Editorial Offices in Europe (Bochum: Projekt Verlag). AIM Research Consortium (2007a) Reporting and Managing European News: Final Report of the Project ʹAdequate Information Management in Europeʹ, 2004–2007 (Bochum/Freiburg: Projekt Verlag). Aim Research Consortium (2007b) Understanding the Logic of EU Reporting from Brussels: Analysis of Interviews with EU Correspondents and Spokespersons (Bochum: Projekt Verlag). Baisnée (2007) ʹThe European Public Sphere does Not Exist (at Least itʹs Worth  Wondering . . . )ʹ, European Journal of Communication, 22(4): 493–503. Baisnée, O. (2002) ʹCan Political Journalism Exist at the EU Level?ʹ, in R. Kuhn and E. Neveu (eds), Political Journalism: New Challenges, New Practices (London: Routledge), 108–28. Downey, J., and Koenig, T. (2006) ʹIs there a European Public Sphere? The Berlusconi–Schultz Caseʹ, European Journal of Communication, 21(2): 165–87. EURONAT (2005) Representations of Europe and the Nation in Current and Prospective Member‐States: Media, Elites and Civil Society. Final Report (Florence: EURONAT/European University Institute). Gleissner, M., and de Vreese, C. H. (2005) ʹNews about the EU Constitution: Journalistic Challenges and Media Portrayal of the European Union Constitution. Journalism, 6(2): 221–42. Lloyd, J. & C. Marconi (2014) Reporting the EU: News Media and the European Institutions (London, I.B. Tauris). Machill, M. (1998) ʹEuronews: The First European News Channel as a Case Study for Media Industry Development in Europe and for Spectra of Transnational Journalism Researchʹ, Media, Culture and Society, 20(4): 427–50. Machill, M., Beiler, M., and Fischer, C. (2006) ʹEurope‐Topics in Europeʹs Media: The Debate about the European Public Sphere. A Meta‐Analysis of Media Content Analysisʹ, European Journal of Communication, 21(1): 57–88. Making Journalists (London: Routledge). Mancini, P. (2005) ʹIs there a European Model of Journalism?ʹ, in H. De Burgh (ed.), Mancini, P.et al. (2007) ʹContext, News Values and Relationships with Sources: Three Factors Determining Professional Practices of Media Reporting on European Mattersʹ, in A. R. Consortium (ed.), Reporting and Managing European News: Final Report of the Project ʹAdequate Information Management in Europeʹ 2004–2007 (Bochum/Freiburg: Projekt Verlag), 117–53. Ornebring, H. (2009) Working Paper: Comparative European Journalism (Reuters Institution for the Study of Journalism, University of Oxford). Semetko, H. A., and Valkenburg, P. M. (2000) ʹFraming European Politics: A Content Analysis of Press and Television Newsʹ, Journal of Communication, 50(2): 93–109. Trenz, H.‐J. (2004) ʹMedia Coverage on European Governance: Exploring the European Public Sphere in National Quality Newspapersʹ, European Journal of Communication, 19(3): 291–319. Triandafyllidou, A. (2007) Policy Brief: Main Findings and Recommendations Regarding Media Communication in and on Europe and the EU (Florence: European University Institute).

Elective

EUJ212 | TV and Digital Realities

Semester: A
ECTS: 10

Course Description This course concentrates on the various ways television has culturally influenced the modern societies but also the role it plays in the era of media convergence. The main issue that will be examined is the gradual change of television from a medium characterizing mass communication to that which inaugurates the culture of individualization. A historical approach to the entertaining TV genres and the narratives and types of identification offered by them will be applied. Issues of adapting globalized (and mainly American) TV symbolic products to certain political, social and cultural expectations and stereotypes will be questioned. Reception studies concerning TV audiences will be examined and applied to certain contemporary TV products (mostly series), especially these that are considered to construct a “quality” TV culture the last decades. The diffusion of these products through the world of internet and the increasing formation of TV fandom in digital terms will be a subject of great research interest. Workload Type of work Description Hours Lectures Thirteen 3-hours lectures 39 Independent study Study of compulsory and optional literature 40-45 In Class presentation Presentation of main contemporary researches in the field 20-25 Research Search and analyze media discourses concerning public and private issues 35-40 Written assignments Essay (5000 words) 120-140 Total workload 254-289 Assessment Type of assessment Learning outcome Impact on final grade Date of assessment Participation in group work and discussion 1-2 20% Regularly In Class presentation 1-2 30% 8th-12th week Written assignment (essay) 1-4 50% 12th week Recommended Reading Allen, R. Hill, A. (eds.), The television studies reader, London: Routledge. Andrejevic, M. Reality TV. The work of being watched, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2004 Cavender, G., Fishman, M. (ed.), Entertaining Crime: Television Reality Programs, New York: Aldine De Gruyter, 1998 Costello, V., Moore, B. “Cultural Outlaws: An Examination of Audience Activity and online television fandom”, Television New Media 2007 8: 124 Couldry, Ν., Media rituals: a critical approach, New York: Routledge, 2003. Dalton, M. Linder, L., The sitcom reader. America viewed and skewed , State University of New York, 2005 Elsaesser T., Simons, J., Bronk, L. (eds), Writing for The medium. Television in Transition, Amsterdam University Press, Amsterdam, 1994 Fiske, J., Television Culture, Routledge, London, 1987 Friedman, J.(ed.) Reality squared, televisual discourse on the real, New Jersey and London: Rutgers University Press, 2002. Hartley J., Popular reality. Journalism, modernity, popular culture, Λονδίνο, 1996. Jean K. Chalaby (ed), Transnational Television Worldwide:Towards a New Media Order, Tauris, NY, 2005 Jenkins H., Textual Poachers Television Fans & Participatory Culture, Routledge, London-NY, 1992 Jenkins, H. Convergence Culture, New York University Press, 2006 Jenkins, H. Fans, bloggers and gamers. Exploring participatory culture, New York: New York University Press, 2006. Kellner, D., Media Spectacle, New York: Routledge, 2003 Kuipers G., “Countries Transnational Television and National Media Landscapes in Four European Cultural Globalization as the Emergence of a Transnational Cultural Field”, American Behavioral Scientist 55: 541, 2011 Livingstone, S., “Why People Watch Soap Opera: An Analysis of the Explanations of British Viewers”, European Journal of Communication 1988 3: 55 McCabe, J. Akass, K., Quality TV. Contemporary American Television and Beyond, Tauris, NY, 2007. Morley D., Brunsdon C., The Nationwide Television Studies, London-NY, Routledge, 1999 Ouellette, L. (eds.) Reality TV: Remaking Television Culture. New York and London: New York University Press Shimpach, S. Television in Transition. The Life and Afterlife of the Narrative Action Hero, Blackwell 2010 Tulloch, J., Jenkins,H., Science fiction audiences, Watching Doctor Who and Star Trek, Routledge, London 1995 Tulloch, J., Watching Television Audiences, Cultural theories and methods, Arnold, London 2000 Williams R., Television, Routledge, London-ΝΥ, 1974

EUJ 216 | Crisis And Risk Communication In Europe

Semester: B
ECTS: 10

Course Description Europe conceivably is dealing with the last phase of a major crisis while at the same time new threats are rising for its security and its way of life. During a crisis, communication is a crucial part of all attempts to handle a perilous situation such as a disaster while at the same time enhances all efforts and actions of managing the consequences of crises and speeding the recovering processes. Similarly risk communication is an indefeasible part of risk management and is closely related to crisis communication. Its purpose is to enable audiences to understand how risks can have an effect to them and their societies. In liberal and democratic societies such as the ones found in Europe, the importance of engaging the community in dealing with a crisis or a disaster is even more important. The proper argumentation in a scientific but easily explicable way can empower the public to have the right sort of input in regulatory process. “Crisis and risk communication in Europe” through seven topics will enable participants to understand the importance and effects of crisis and risk communication in the contemporary fast changing media and technological environment. Media trends in Europe. This topic will provide the participants with an insight on media trends in Europe and how they are going to affect communication and human societies in a range so wide covering from home entertainment to even democratic processes. Crisis Management. This topic will provide the participants with an overview and an understanding of all aspects of crisis management and its stages. In addition, it will cover how risk and crisis communication plays a detrimental role in planning process, crisis handling and in post-crisis, recovery phase. Risk communication and media. This topic will provide the participants with an outline on the role and importance of media in engaging and informing audiences in risk communication. Risk communication and cyber-security. This topic will introduce the participants with the concept of cyber security in risk communication and during risk management. It will analyze potential threats and the importance of computer technology in communication. Risk communication and hybrid threats. This topic will explain to the participants the nature of hybrid threats and non-linear war, the definition of the grey zone of a conflict and the role of risk communication in preparing societies to increase their resilience to hybrid threats. Risk communication and new media trends. This topic will deliver to the participants with an insight to new media trends in a fast-changing world and the implications of technologies like metaverse, Augmented reality and virtual reality. Risk communication and Artificial Intelligence. This topic will cover the existing and potential uses of Artificial intelligence in communication and its application in engaging societies with risk communication by providing tools, patterns and data that were not possible to be employed in the past. Course Evaluation Presentations and verbal contributions by all students are essential. It is expected that students attend each class. Each student will be responsible for one or two presentations. During the presentation, students present an effective summary of their prescribed reading/research, offer their insight into its arguments/significance and direct class discussion on it. Each student will write an investigative report (roughly 5.000 words, incl. references/footnotes). Bibliography will be suggested and if possible be provided by the instructor. Students will work and research in greater detail their class presentations or in collaboration with their professor agree on a specific topic they would like to research/write. Workload Type of work Description Hours Lectures Thirteen 3-hours lectures 39 Independent study Study of compulsory and optional literature 61 Research Online research 30 Presentations Student in-class presentations (individual or group presentations) 50 Written assignments Written assignments Research essay (5000 words) and investigative report (3000 words) in-class presentations 120 Total workload 300 Assessment Type of assessment Learning outcome Impact on final grade Date of assessment Participation in group work and discussion 1-2 10% Regularly In class presentations 1-2, 5 30% 7th and 13th week Investigative reports 3-4 30% 13th week Written assignment (essay) 1-5 30% 13th week  

EUJ 215 | Civil Society, Media and Public Diplomacy

Semester: A
ECTS: 10

Course Description Τhe course examines how transnational and multidimensional civil society efforts can work in the trajectory of enhancing the transparency, legitimacy and awareness of European politics and media, by creating spaces for alternative theorizations to mainstream paradigms, aiming and shaping shape conducive ground for alternative, potentially groundbreaking policies, as well as functioning in the direction of existing policies, making them more efficient. In addition, the course will also introduce and examine the concept of strategic communication discursive processes and how it can play an essential role in politics and diplomacy in the twenty-first century.  Strategic refers to the need to focus on the mounting problems for and relevant to most, if not all, parts of the global population.  Discursive refers to the need to create hubs for discussion, argumentation and counter-argumentation, and feedback. Course Objectives The aim of this course is to explore the digitalization of diplomacy and to shed light on the adaptation level of the European Union by presenting its activity on social media. The main teaching and research questions posed are: in what ways has the European Union used digital tools to respond to crises? what are the (recurring) challenges facing the European Union so as to improve its image in a changing world and enhance its role as a leading global actor? how the diversity and dense texture of civil society and the new media can contribute to European politics/diplomacy? Learning Outcomes Upon completion of the course, students will be able to critically understand how EUPD can and should encourage discursive processes, strengthening the European public sphere with regard to the profoundly political and critical issues of the present era. Class/Learning activities This course will employ seminar lectures and discussions, student in-class presentations, and individual investigative reports. Course Evaluation Presentations and verbal contributions by all students are essential. It is expected that students attend each class. Each student will be responsible for one or two presentations. During the presentation, students present an effective summary of their prescribed reading/research, offer their insight into its arguments/significance and direct class discussion on it. Each student will write an investigative report (roughly 5.000 words, incl. references/footnotes). Bibliography will be suggested and if possible be provided by the instructor. Students will work and research in greater detail their class presentations or in collaboration with their professor agree on a specific topic they would like to research/write. Workload   Type of work Description Hours Lectures Thirteen 3-hours lectures 39 Independent study Study of compulsory and optional literature 61 Research Online research 30 Presentations Student in-class presentations (individual or group presentations) 50 Written assignments Written assignments Research essay (5000 words) and investigative report (3000 words) in-class presentations 120 Total workload 300 Assessment Type of assessment Learning outcome Impact on final grade Date of assessment Participation in group work and discussion 1-2 10% Regularly In class presentations 1-2, 5 30% 7th and 13th week Investigative reports 3-4 30% 13th week Written assignment (essay) 1-5 30% 13th week  

EUJ 214 | Polarization, Communication and Politics: Comparing Europe & the USA

Semester: A
ECTS: 10

Course Description This course seeks to analyze and examine the role that political polarization has played in EU member states and US politics in the 21st century. The first part of the course will define political polarization, the difference between partisanship, populism, and polarization, as well as differences between mass and elite polarization. The second part of the course will explore the relationship between media systems and outlets and politics. Discussions will focus on what role the media has played in the rise of populism and the polarization of party politics in EU member states and in the USA. The final part of the course will examine the proliferation of social and digital media, so-called “Fake News,” and the legitimacy challenges facing the media in the 21st century. In the summation of the course, the consequences of political polarization will be discussed, including how political polarization creates fertile ground for misinformation campaigns (both within EU member states and the USA) that purposefully intend to introduce extreme viewpoints and inflammatory narratives that exacerbate divisions among the public. Course Objectives The main objectives of this course are: to enhance students’ critical thinking skills and assist in the synthesis and assimilation of theories, discourses and analyses of political polarization and the role of the media to enable students to understand what role the media plays in polarization in EU member states and in US politics by analyzing specific media outlets and the language they use to reveal the connection between politics and communication to lay bare the consequences of elite political polarization on public opinion to provide guidance to students to produce an original paper on a subject of their choice relating to the polarization of European or US politics and the role of the media Learning Outcomes By the end of the successful completion of the course, students will be able to: comprehended key theories and concepts related to political polarization and the media in Europe and the US apply the language of political polarization, through analysis of the concept as is demonstrated in Europe and US politics examine the social, economic, and geographical determinants of polarization in the US have comprehended how political polarization has occurred in Europe and the US, the role that the media has played in this, and the consequences emanating from this have completed a class presentation and a comprehensive writing assignment related to polarization and the role of the media Class/Learning activities The course will consist of a series of lectures, class discussions based on the readings and other audiovisual materials provided by the instructor, and student presentations. Students will be required to write a comprehensive research paper on a topic related to political polarization and politics and the role of the media and present that to the class. Students will be guided in writing a literature review of the resources used to write their paper. Workload Type of work Description Hours Lectures Thirteen 3-hour lectures 39 Independent study Study of compulsory and optional literature 61 Research Online research 30 Active Learning Exercises in the classroom 50 Written assignments-Presentations Written assignments a.    two short assignments (500 words) b.    essay (1.500-2000 words) c.    in-class presentations 110                                     Total workload 290 Assessment Type of assessment Learning outcome Impact on final grade Date of assessment Participation in group work and discussion 1-3 20% Regularly Presentation of group work 1-3, 5 20% 13th week Written assignments (short) 1-2 30% 3rd -7th week Written assignment (essay) 5 30% 13th week Required Reading Aalberg, Toril, Frank Esser, Carsten Reinemann, Jesper Strömback, and Claes H. de Vreese eds. (2017) Populist Political Communication in Europe, Routledge Press. Abramowitz, Alan (2019) The Great Alignment: Race, Party Transformation and the Rise of Donald Trump, Yale University Press. Ashley, Seth, Jessica Roberts and Adam Maksl (2019) American Journalism and “Fake News:” Examining the Facts, ABC-Clio. Beaufort, Maren ed. (2019) Digital Media, Political Polarization and Challenges to Democracy, Routledge Press. Campbell, James E. (2016) Making Sense of a Divided America, Princeton University Press. Carothers, Thomas and Andrew O’Donohoe eds. (2019) Democracies Divided: The Global Challenge of Political Polarization, Washington, DC: Brookings Institution Press. Fletcher, R., & Jenkins, J. (2019). Polarisation and the news media in Europe (Vol. 2019, pp 1–49). European Parliament. (pdf) Hallin, Daniel C., and Paolo Mancini. (2017) “Ten Years After Comparing Media Systems: What Have We Learned?” Political Communication 34 (2): 155–71. Hawks, Banu Baybars and Sarphan Uzunoğlu eds. (2019) Polarization, Populism and the New Politics: Media Communication in a Changing World, Cambridge Scholars Publishing. Hopkins, Daniel and John Sides (2015) Political Polarization in American Politics, Bloomsbury Academic. Lang, Thilo, Sebastian Henn, Wladimir Sgibnev, and Kornelia Ehrlich eds. (2015) Understanding Geographies of Polarization & Peripheralization, Palgrave MacMillan. McCarthy, Nolan (2019) Polarization: What Everyone Needs to Know, Oxford University Press. Mudde, C. and Kaltwasser, C. R. eds. (2012) Populism in Europe and the Americas: Threat or Corrective for Democracy? Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Patterson, Thomas E. (2019) How America Lost Its Mind: The Assault on Reason That’s Crippling Our Democracy, Norman: University of Oklahoma Press Prior, Markus (2007) Post-Broadcast Democracy: How Media Choice Increases Inequality in Political Involvement and Polarizes Elections, Princeton University Press. Ridout, Travis N. ed. (2018) New Directions in Media and Politics, 2nd edition, Routledge Publishers. Stepinska, Agnieszka ed. (2014) Media and Communication in Europe, Berlin: Logos Verlag. Sunstein, Cass R. (2017) #Republic: Divided Democracy in the Age of Social Media, Princeton University Press. Periodical Literature and Other Electronic Resources Bagginni, J. (2016) “How Rising Trump and Sanders Parallel Rising Populism in Europe,” New Perspectives Quarterly, 33(2). Bennett, W. Lance and Barbara Pfetsch, (2018) “Rethinking Political Communication in a Time of Disrupted Public Spheres,” Journal of Communication, 68, pp. 243-253. Benson, Rodney, Mark Blach-Ørsten, Matthew Powers, Ida Willig, Sandra Vera Zambrano, (2012) “Media Systems Online and Off: Comparing the Form of News in the United States, Denmark, and France,” Journal of Communication, 62: 1, February 2012, pp.21–38 Gounari, P. (2018) “Authoritarianism, Discourse and Social Media: Trump as the ‘American Agitator’ ” In: […]

EUJ 211 | Media and Diversity in Europe

Semester: B
ECTS: 10

Course Description The course seeks to introduce students to the concept of cultural and social diversity and analyze the role that media/journalists can play in the social construction, representation and understanding of difference and diversity. It focuses on issues of migration, race and ethnicity, faith and religion, gender, sexuality, age and disability and the way these issues are portrayed by traditional and new media. It also equips the students with practical skills that will enable them to produce a media product (a blog) on a topic related to social and cultural diversity. Course Objectives Analyze the concept of cultural and social diversity. Approach issues of migration, race and ethnicity, faith and religion, gender, sexuality, age and disability. Examine the role that media/journalists can play in the social construction and representation of diversity. Equip the students with practical skills that will enable them to produce a media product (a blog) on a topic related to social and cultural diversity. Learning Outcomes Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Define the core concepts of cultural and social diversity Critically understand the social and media structures and journalistic practices that impact upon issues of diversity Understand how media/journalism can contribute to combat negative stereotypes Offer alternative approaches to negative stereotypes through reporting Acquire the practical skills to engage in responsible media coverage of diversity. Class/Learning activities Lectures, workshops, in-class presentations, literature study, written assignments. Workload Type of work Description Hours Lectures Thirteen 3-hours lectures 39 Independent study Study of compulsory and optional literature 61 Research Online research 30 Workshops Exercises in the classroom 50 Written assignments-Presentations Written assignments a.    five short assignments (500 words) b.    essay (1.500-2000 words) c.    in-class presentations 120                                     Total workload 300 Assessment Type of assessment Learning outcome Impact on final grade Date of assessment Participation in group work and discussion 1-2 20% Regularly Presentation of group work 1-2, 5 20% 13th week Written assignments (short) 3-4 30% 4th-13th week Written assignment (essay) 1-5 30%    -13th week Required Reading Bibliography Aldrich, Leigh Stephens. Covering the Community: A Diversity Handbook for Media. Thousand Oaks, CA: Pine Forge Press, 1999. Biagi, Shirley and Marilyn Kern-Foxworth. Facing Difference: Race, Gender, and Mass Media. Thousand Oaks, CA: Pine Forge Press, 1997. Bradley, Patricia and Gail Collins. Women and the Press: the Struggle for Equality. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2005. Broussard, Jinx Coleman. Giving a Voice to the Voiceless: Four Pioneering Black Women Journalists. New York: Routledge, 2004. Cropp, Fritz, Cynthia M. Frisby and Dean Mills. Journalism Across Cultures. Ames: Iowa States Press, 2003. Dijk, Teun Adrianus Van. Racism and the Press. New York: Routledge, 1991. Gutierrez, Felix, Clint Wilson and Lena Chao. Racism, Sexism, and the Media: The Rise of Class Communication in Multicultural America. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 2003. Keever, Bevery Ann Deepe, et al., eds. U.S. News Coverage of Racial Minorities. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1997. Morgan, Arlene Notoro, Keith Woods and Alice Irene Pifer. The Authentic Voice: The Best Reporting on Race and Ethnicity. New York: Columbia University Press, 2006. Roberts, Gene and Hank Klibanoff. The Race Beat: the Press, the Civil Rights Struggle, and the Awakening of a Nation. New York: Knopf, 2006. Toth, Elizabeth L. and Linda Aldorry, eds. The Gender Challenge to Media: Diverse Voices from the Field. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press, 2001. Van Dijk, Teun A. Racism and the Press. New York: Routledge, 1991.

EUJ 210 | Research Seminar: Reporting Europe

Semester: B
ECTS: 10

Course Description This course encourages students to work and research on severalimportant political, economic, societal and global dimensions/challenges of Europe, which occupy a central position in the agenda of European Journalism. Students will work on investigative research projects/reports in small groups. In so doing, they will not only have to develop the plan, methodology and organization of the reports themselves, but will also present their research (during the term) and submit investigative reports (at the end of the term). Course Objectives The objective of this form of work and evaluation is twofold: that students enrich their knowledge about the economic, social, political and global contexts of Europe/European Union, and in so doing improve their analytical skills and insight by researching and scrutinizing a problem/challenge of the EU that students learn how to write investigative journalistic reports. Learning Outcome Upon successful completion of the course students will be able: To critically read, research and analyze the challenges of Europe/EU To enrich their knowledge on key economic, social, political and global processes of Europe/EU, To understand and communicate complex European/EU challenges/problems To write projects/articles reflecting a critical ‘European perspective’ Class and learning activities Workshops, group-work, class presentations, research and written assignments/projects. Guest speakers will also offer their perspective on the topics discussed in class. Workload Type of work Description Hours Workshops/guest speakers Ten 30 Independent study Research 50 Exercises and Presentations To be discussed and decided with the tutor of the course 100 Written projects To be discussed and decided with the tutor of the course 120 Total workload 300 Assessment Type of assessment Learning outcome Impact on final grade Date of assessment Written project 1-4 60% 13th-15th week Presentations 1-4 20% 11th- 13th week Exercises 1-4 20% Regularly Useful Links https://www.journalismfund.eu https://www.investigate-europe.eu/en/ https://eic.network https://cmpf.eui.eu/strengthening-journalism-in-europe/ https://ejc.net https://en.ejo.ch https://dataharvest.eu  https://www.icij.org

EUJ 204 | European Journalistic Cultures

Semester: A
ECTS: 10

Course Description Established historical and sociological studies of journalism tend to approach their subject in either a nationally bounded space or in terms of abstract institutional models.The course aims to remedy the limitations of these approaches by offering a comparative perspective on journalistic professional practices and values, which, based on the concept of ‘journalistic cultures’, prioritizes questions of socio-cultural and political context. Focusing particularly on Europe, the course investigates the diverse journalistic traditions that continue to exert a shaping influence on news reporting in different countries and regions, as well as on the self perceptions, audience evaluations, public role and professional code of journalists. Course Objectives Understand the core concepts of ‘journalistic culture’ and ‘journalistic field’, and their usefulness in the cross-national study of journalism Understand the significance of socio-cultural and political context in the formation of news and journalistic cultures Awarness of the impact that diverse journalistic cultures have in the making and framing of news, and, more specifically, of European Union related news Appreciation of the heterogeneity of the european journalistic cultures and its repercussions in the workings of the European public sphere Learning Outcomes Define core concepts and approaches in the comparative study of journalism Explain the dependency of journalistic professional roles and practices on socio-cultural and political context Identify the ways that journalistic cultures shape news agendas and the framing of news Analyze processes of convergence and divergence in contemporary European and global journalism Class/Learning activities Lectures, in-class presentations, independent study, written assignments. Workload Type of work Description Hours Lectures Thirteen 3-hours lectures 39 Independent study Study of class materials and readings 50-60 Readings presentation Presenting & leading a discussion on a given topic 25-30 In-class presentation Conference type presentation of final paper 15-20 Final paper Conference type presentation of final paper 110-120 Total workload 239-269 Assessment Type of assessment Learning outcome Impact on final grade Date of assessment Participation in group discussion 1-4 10% On a regular basis Reading presentation 1-3 20% On a regular basis Presentation 1-4 10% 13th week Written assignment (final paper) 2-4 60% 14th week Required Reading De Burgh, H. (ed.) (2005). Making Journalists. Diverse Models, Global Issues. London: Routledge Bourdieu, P (1999). On Television. New Press Weaver, D. & L. Willnat (eds.) (2013) The Global Journalist in the 21st Century. London: Routledge Suggested Reading Archetti, Ch. (2010). Explaining News. National Politics and Journalistic Cultures in Global Context. Palgrave Macmillan Aumente, J. & P. Gross (1999). Eastern European Journalism: Before, During and After Communism. Hampton Press Freedman, E. & R. Scafer (eds.) (2011). After the Czars and Commissars: Journalism in Authoritarian Post-Soviet Central Asia. Michigan State University Press Glowacki, M., E.Lauk & A. Balcytiene (eds.) (2014). Journalism that Matters: Views form Central and Eastern Europe. Peter Lang Grieves, K. (2012). Journalism across Boundaries: The Promises and Challenges of Transnational and Transborder Journalism. Palgrave Macmillan Hallin, D.C. & P. Mancini (2004). Comparing Media Systems: Three Models of Media and Politics. Cambridge University Press Kuhn, R. & R. Nielsen (2013). Political Journalism in Transition: Western Europe in a Comparative Perspective. I.B.Tauris Loffelholz, M. & D.H Weaver (eds.) (2008). Global Journalism Research. Oxford: Blackwell Shoemaker, P. & A. Cohen (eds.) (2006) News around the World: content, practitioners, and the public. New York: Routledge Stephens, M. (2006). A History of News. Oxford University Press, 3rd ed. MacNair, B. (1998). The Sociology of Journalism. Bloomsbury Academic Waisbord, S. (2013) Reinventing Professionalism: Journalism and News in Global Perspective. Polity Resourses on the Internet http://www.worldsofjournalism.org/index.htm

Optional

MCC 400 | Communication Research Methods

Semester: A
ECTS: NO

Course Description This unit covers in detail the practice of research methods in the field of communication. Students will become familiar with developing the research question(s), formulating the hypotheses of their study, selecting participants and instruments. Moreover, they will explore the various designs that are used in quantitative (e.g. experimental and quasi experimental design, correlational design, surveys) and qualitative (e.g. interviews, focus groups, participant observations) research.  During these sessions students will learn how to select the appropriate research design depending on the area they wish to study and the analysis that is required for each set of data (quantitative or qualitative).  A great emphasis is also given to the ethical issues in research methods. Course Objectives Provide students the knowledge and experience to became informed consumers of scientific research Provide students with the skills and knowledge necessary to carry out a research project Provide students with a reflexive and critical attitude towards research. Learning Outcomes Understand the issues involved in the design of research in the field of communication Understand the strengths and weaknesses of each research methodology Formulate a clear research question and be able to write a research proposal Select the appropriate research technique to answer specific research questions in the field of communication Communicate and disseminate the research output Class/Learning activities Lectures, workshops, group work, in-class presentations, literature study, written assignments Workload Type of work Description Hours Lectures Thirteen 3-hours lectures 39 Independent study Study of compulsory and optional literature 30-40 Group Research Small scale research 55-65 Written assignments Literature review (1.500-2.000 words)Research proposal (2.000-2.500 words) 110-120 Presentations In-class oral presentations 20-30 Total workload 254-294 Assessment Type of assessment Learning outcome Impact on final grade Date of assessment Participation in group work and discussion 1-2 10% Regularly Presentation 5 10% 8th -12th week Group research 2-4 20% 6th – 8th week Literature review 2-4 30% 8th week Research proposal 2-5 30% 13th week Required Reading Creswell, J. W. (2014).  Qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods approaches (4rth ed.). Thousand Oak: CA, Sage. Merrigan, G., & Huston, C. L. (2008). Communication research methods. Oxford University. Silverman, D. (2010). Doing qualitative research (3rd ed.). London: Sage. Additional Recommended Reading Babbie, E. (2013). The basics of social research (6th ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Cengage Learning. Baxter, L., & Babbie, E. (2004). The basics of communication research. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Thomson Learning Field, A. (2013). Discovering statistics using IBM SPSS Statistics (4rth ed). Thousand Oakes, CA: Sage Lindlof, T. R., & Taylor, B. C. (2008). Qualitative communication research methods (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Mertens, D. M. (2015). Research and evaluation in education and psychology: Integrating diversity with quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods (4rth ed.). Thousand Oak: CA, Sage.

MCC 402 | Qualitative Research Methods in Communication

Semester: B
ECTS: 10

Course description The course aims to introduce students to the conceptualization, design, and difficulties of qualitative research methods used in media and communication studies, including participant observation and digital ethnography, depth interviews, focus groups, historical analysis, discourse, thematic, visual and content analysis. Course objectives Develop an attitude of exploring inquiries, innovation and creativity, concerning the fields of journalism and popular culture Develop critical thinking skills to assess ideas, acquiring research skills, synthesizing knowledge across disciplines and applying academic knowledge to personal experiences throughout the media world. Develop research abilities through implementing qualitative methodological tools for investigating either the production/content of mediated messages or the audience responses to them. Learning outcomes Familiarize with the logic, design, and pitfalls of qualitative research in media and communication Apply general principles of qualitative analysis to accomplish and evaluate research in media and communication Associate major techniques of qualitative analysis to concrete research topics of interest. Class/Learning activities Lectures, group work, in-class presentations, literature study, written assignments.

MCC 401 | Dissertation Research & Writing Skills

Semester: B
ECTS: 10

Course Description This course is designed to help graduate students with academic writing by developing the skills necessary to produce high quality work in term-papers and the end-of-year dissertation. The lectures, tasks and activities are richly varied, ranging from small-scale language points to studying the discourse of journalism, media, and communication. Topics to be dealt with include: writing expository and argumentative texts, writing summaries, introductions and conclusions, discussion of data, citing and attributing sources, researching and creating bibliographies. Students receive feedback on their writing and are expected to engage in self-editing and peer-reviewing. The course is highly recommended for students with little experience in writing academic papers and for those who need to brush up their skills in academic writing. Learning Outcomes By the end of this course students should be able to: Understand the features of academic writing Understand the basics of sentence, paragraph, and argument structure Use and evaluate sources, and compile a bibliography Use punctuation, in-text references, quotations, and footnotes Avoid plagiarism Write summaries/introductions/conclusions Write academic essays and their end-of-year dissertation Understand and participate in the processes of self-editing and peer-reviewing. Workload Type of work Description Hours Lectures Thirteen 3-hour lectures 39 Independent study Study of academic discourse 30 Written assignments Optional tasks on language points (grammar, vocabulary, style)  and on various types of academic writing 60 Total workload 129  Assessment Type of assessment Learning outcome Impact on final grade Date of assessment The course carries no formal assessment – – –