Digital Media, Culture and Communication

The pathway focuses on the new nexus between media, culture and society forged in the digital age. Specifically, it addresses the impact and implications of the digital transformation, with particular emphasis to the fields of media/cultural industries, connective media, and civil society.

Learning Objectives

  • Critical understanding of the new media environment
  • Skills in digital content production
  • Effective use of digital platforms and tools in engaging audiences
  • Expertise in successfully transitioning an organization to digital

Program Details

Digital Media, Communication and Journalism is a full-time (90 ECTS) English language Master’s program, the first of its kind among Greek public Universities. Designed to combine practice-based learning with sustained theoretical reflection, the intensive 12 months post-graduate program includes two course semesters and a third one, dedicated to the research and writing of a Thesis.

Program Structure

The structure of the program has been designed with a view to combine in-depth specialization with students’ freedom to select a set of courses that best matches their research and professional interests.

For the successful completion of each pathway students must:

  • Take the core course of the preferred pathway
  • Select at least 3 electives offered in the preferred pathway
  • Select up to 2 electives offered by the other two pathways
  • Complete a dissertation on a topic related to the subject areas covered by the preferred pathway.

 

Semester Courses Description ECTS
1st 3 courses 1 core course (10 ECTS) and 2 electives (20 ECTS) 1 of which can be from another pathway 30
2nd 3 courses 3 electives 1 of which can be from another pathway 30
1st and 2nd Semester Credits 60
3rd Dissertation 30
Total Credits 90

Core Course

DIM 101 | New Media: Theories and Perspectives

Semester: A
ECTS: 10

Course Description The course introduces students to certain key theoretical concepts, approaches and debates concerning the understanding and critical analysis of the role of new media in contemporary society. It combines an analytical perspective, that sheds light on some crucial aspects, functions and uses of new media, with a historical perspective, that places new media within a broader understanding of technology and its relationship to culture and social change. The course explores some major research areas in a way that prioritizes interdisciplinarity, grounded on on-going research rather than abstract theorizing, innovative and critical thinking about current issues and challenges, as well as the value of combining quantitative and qualitative perspectives. Course Objectives Understanding of the central concepts, approaches and debates concerning new media Critical assessment of new media theories and research approaches Effective use of new media theories and research approaches in the understanding and analysis of contemporary social issues, problems and changes Ability to contribute to debates regarding major dimensions and problems of new media, e.g. hybridity, communication, interactivity, participation, connectivity, privacy, memory, access, politics etc. Learning Outcomes Define core concepts and approaches in the study of new media Compare and contrast the different new media theories and research approaches Effectively apply them in the analysis of specific contemporary issues and phenomena Becoming aware of the complex interrelationship and interaction between technology, society and culture Class/Learning activities Lectures, in-class presentations and debates, independent study, individual essays.  Workload Type of work Description Hours Lectures thirteen 3-hours lectures 39 Independent study Study of class materials and readings 50-60 Readings in-class presentation Presenting & leading a discussion on a given topic 25-30 Essay outline in-class presentation Conference type presentation of essay outline 25-30 Research essay 5.000 words written assignment 100-110 Total workload 239-269 Assessment Type of assessment Learning outcome Impact on final grade Date of assessment Participation in in-class discussions 1-4 10% On a regular basis In-class presentation of course readings 1-3 10% Weeks 2 – 12 In-class presentation of essay outline 2-4 10% Week 13 Research essay 2-4 70% Week 15 Required Reading Holmes, D. (2005). Communication Theory: Media, Technology and Society. London: Sage Lister, M., J. Dovey, S. Giddings, I. Grant & K. Kelly (2009). New Media. A Critical Introduction.  London/N. York: Routledge (2nd ed.). Jenkins, H., M. Ito & D. Boyd (2016). Participatory Culture in a Networked Era. Cambridge: Polity. Suggested Reading Castells, M. 2009. Communication Power. Oxford: Oxford University Press Chadwick, A 2013. The Hybrid Media System. Politics and Power. Oxford: Oxford University Press Christakis, N. & J. Fowler (2009). Connected. The Surprising Power of Social Networks and How They Shape Our Lives. New York: Little, Brown & Co Manovich, L. (2013). Software Takes Command. London: Bloomsbury Van Dijk, J. (2013). The Culture of Connectivity. A Critical History of Social Media. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Elective

DIM102 | Digital tools in new media

Semester: A
ECTS: 10

Course Description New media refers to live and on-demand access to content anytime, anywhere, from a wide variety of digital devices, as well as interactive user feedback, creative participation and community formation around the media content. This course examines issues related to information and communication technologies with emphasis on those related to the media industry and the new media concept. More specifically it examines the technological evolution, the digital convergence, as well as, the Internet and its services. Also, emphasis is given on digital technologies of sound and image, the new environments of audiovisual content production and consumption, along with the technologies of social networking and Web 2.0 that form the modern environment of communication and knowledge at all levels. These issues are examined from a technological perspective but also in terms of use by media professionals. Course Objectives Analyze the ICT evolution that led to the technological convergence and the New Media. Distinguish the basic characteristics of New Media. Understand the internet technology and services with emphasis in those that are utilized by media organizations. Explain the technological evolution, the similarities and the differences between traditional, electronic, digital and New Media. Comprehend the technologies and the characteristics of sound and image in digital and New Media. Analyze as benchmarks best practices of New Media usage in media organizations. Learning Outcomes Define the core technologies of New Media. Comprehend the special characteristics the new environments of audiovisual content production and consumption New Media. Acquire the necessary technological knowledge in order to fully exploit the potential of New Media in media organizations. Class/Learning activities Lectures, group discussions. in-class presentations, literature study, written assignments.  Workload Type of work Description Hours Lectures ten 3-hour lectures 30 Case study presentations three 3-hour presentations 9 Independent study Study of compulsory and optional literature 40-45 Research Online research 35-40 Written assignments-Presentations Written assignments essay (000-5.000 words) in-class presentations 140-160 Total workload 254-284  Assessment Type of assessment Learning outcome Impact on final grade Date of assessment Participation in group  discussion 1 10% 1st-12rd week Mid-term exam 1-2 10% 7th week Presentation of assignment 2-3 30% 10th-12th week Written assignment 1-3 40% 13th week Recommended Texts Dewdney, A. (2013). The digital media handbook. London: Routledge. Flew, T. (2014). New media. South Melbourne, Vic.: Oxford University Press. Jeremy Hunsinger and Theresa M. Senft. 2013. The Social Media Handbook (1st ed.). Routledge, New York, NY, 10001. Eugenia Siapera and Andreas Veglis (eds) (2012), The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Online Journalism, Blackwell Publishing. Peter Norton (2008) Introduction to Computers, McGraw Hill

DIM 108 | Network Society: Theories & Practices

Semester: A + B
ECTS: 10

Course Description The  2nd Media Age is characterized by the decline of mass media and the rise of social or connective or spreadable media. We no longer talk of a m’mass society’ or even an ‘information society, but of a ‘network society’. Networks have become the nervous system of our society, a vast new communication infrastructure whose design and potential are transforming all aspects of social life, from the drastic redistribution of power and knowledge to the radical refashioning of socio-economic action, cultural interaction and inter-personal relations. Τhe course focuses on the historical and critical analysis of the emergence of social media, and employs a wide range of case-studies and ethnographic material to investigate how the connectivity culture of Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and the many other platforms of the social media ecosystem is producing a new anthropological condition. Course Objectives Understand the core concepts and theories of network society and social media Explore the technical, social, economic and cultural aspects and potential of social media Awareness of the features and dimensions of connectivity culture as an ongoing techno-social construction Appreciation of the anthropological transformation produced by the social media ecosystem Learning Outcomes Define the core concepts and theories of network society and social media Explain the transformative social dynamics and potential of social media Identify the techno-social nexus underlying connectivity culture Critically analyze contemporary sociality/subjectivity as produced by the social media ecosystem Class/Learning activities Lectures, in-class presentations, independent study, written assignments. Workload Type of work Description Hours Lectures Thirteen 3-hours lectures 39 Independent study Study of class materials and readings 50-60 Readings presentation Presenting & leading a discussion on a given topic 25-30 In-class presentation Conference type presentation of final paper 15-20 Final paper Research essay (5.000 words) 110-120 Total workload 239-269 Assessment Type of assessment Learning outcome Impact on final grade Date of assessment Participation in group discussion 1-3 10% On a regular basis Reading presentation 1-2 20% On a regular basis Presentation 1-4 10% 13th week Written assignment (final paper) 2-4 60% 14th week Required Reading Castells, M. (2009). The Rise of the Network Society: The Information Age: Economy, Society and Culture, vol.I. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2nd ed. Kadushin, Ch. (2012). Understanding Social Networks. Theories, Concepts, and Findings. Oxford University Press Serres, M. (2014). Thumbelina: The Culture and Technology of Millenials. Rowan & Littlefield Van Dijck, J. (2013). The Culture of Connectivity. A Critical History of Social Media. Oxford: Oxford University Press Van Dijck, J. (2012). The Network Society: Social Aspects of New Media. London: Sage, 3nd ed. Suggested Reading Castells, M. (2011). Communication Power. Oxford University Press, 2nd ed. Castells, M. (2012). Networks of Outrage and Hope: Social Movements in the Internet Age. Oxford: Polity Christakis, N. & J. Fowler (2009). Connected: The Surprising Power of Our Social Networks and How they Shape Our Lives. New York: Little, Brown and Company Galloway, A. & E. Thacker (2007). The Exploit: A Theory of Networks. University of  Minnesota Press Jenkins, H., S. Ford & J. Green (2013). Spreadable Media: Creating Value and Meaning in a Networked Culture. New York & London: New Uork University Press Levy, P. (1999). Collective Intelligence: Mankind’s Emerging World in Cyberspace. New York: Basic Books Lovink, G. (2011). Networks Without a Cause: A Critique of Social Media. Oxford: Polity Papacharissi, Z. (ed.) (2011). A Networked Self. Identity, Community, and Culture on Social Network Sites. London: Routledge Terranova, T. (2004). Network Culture: Politics for the Information Age. London: Pluto Press

DIM 109 | Mobile Travel Journalism

Semester: A + B
ECTS: 10

Course Description This course provides students with a broad understanding of the global Tourism sector and the latest trends in the travel industry. It focuses on the role of digital media, User Generated Content (UGC) and digital storytelling in travel and tourism. The course offers a combination of theory, case studies and hands-on training, aimed at exploring new forms of travel communication through digital media. Key topics Global trends in travel and tourism Travel Communication and Sustainability Travel Journalism and digital Travel Storytelling Digital Media Communication Campaigns for Tourism UGC and eWOM Course Objectives Understand the role of digital media in travel and tourism. Track, analyze, and discuss UGC related to travel destinations. Recognize, understand, analyze, and discuss the travel article typology. Recognize the structure and narrating techniques of travel stories. Appreciate the role of travel journalism and travel UGC in communicating culture, in understanding and respecting the ‘Others’ Learning Outcomes Acquire knowledge about the current trends in travel and tourism. Analyze and produce online travel stories. Criticize how travel journalists, or travelers construct tourist experiences and destination images. Analyze and criticize digital media communication campaigns for tourism Class/Learning activities Mentoring lectures, group work, in-class presentation of case studies, literature study, experiential lab (hands on training)  Workload Type of work Description Hours In class lectures, Presentations and hands on exercises Thirteen 3-hours 39 Research Online research 50-60 Independent study Study of suggested literature 40-45 Project based group work Small creative in class group tasks 20-25 Case study and report or Digital Media project Final project Students may choose: a. A case study ( Written report and presentation) b. A digital media project (according to personal interests) 100-110 Total workload 249-279 Assessment Type of assessment Learning outcome Impact on final grade Date of assessment Participation in group work and discussion 1-4 20% Every week Presentation of creative tasks and experiential exercises 2-4 30% 3th-12th week Final Project 2-4 40% 9th-12th week Presentation of the Final Project 1-4 10% 13th week Suggested Reading Akehurst, G. (2009). ‘User Generated Content: The Use of Blogs for Tourism Organisations and Tourism Consumers.’ Service Business 3:51–61. Cocking, B. (2009): ‘Travel Journalism’, Journalism Studies, Vol 10 (1), 54-68 Dewdney, A. (2013). The digital media handbook. London: Routledge. Hanusch, F., Fürsich, E. (2014) Travel Journalism. Palgrave Macmillan. Hsial, K., Lu, H.-P., & Lan, W.-C. (2013). The influence of the components of storytelling blogs on readers’ travel intentions. Internet Research, 23, 160–182. King, R. A., Pradeep R., and Bush, V. (2014). ‘What We Know and Don’t Know about Online Word-of-Mouth: A Review and Synthesis of the Literature.’ Journal of Interactive Marketing 28(3):167–83 McGaurr, L. (2015). Environmental Communication and Travel Journalism. NY: Routledge. Urry, J. and Larsen, J. (2011) The Tourist Gaze 3.0. London: Sage. World Tourism Organization UNTWO (2014) International Tourism Exceeds Expectations with Arrivals Up by 52 Million in 2013. (Press Release, 20 January). Available at: http://media.unwto.org/press-release/2014-01-20/international-tourism-exceeds-expectations-arrivals-52-million-2013

DIM 110 | Digital audiovisual content production and publishing

Semester: B
ECTS: 10

Course Description The course aims at giving students the essential knowledge on digital audiovisual content production and publishing to the new media environment. It involves the development of creative thinking along with lecturing the basic principles in audiovisual production. Sound and image fundamentals, hearing and vision aspects are deployed initially, followed by composition essentials and editing theory and techniques for both audio and video. Capturing equipment and software applications related to audio and video content are used presenting the different ways they may be used in order the final outcome to be reached. The students work hands-on in the laboratory, produce content and make it presentable over various platforms, such as broadcast TV channels, media sharing services (Youtube, soundcloud, etc.), live streaming services (UStream, etc) or social networking (Facebook, Google+, etc) and microblogging (Twitter). Course Objectives Present and explain the basic characteristics of audio and video signals from the point of recording to the final production. Improve the technical judgment criteria for radio and television production evaluation. Analyze the different technical specifications of the various content types derived by the use of diverse equipment along with the need for multi-platform presentation. Through individual and team practicing methods for digital audiovisual production and publishing both traditional and New Media demands are examined. Analyze, understand and exploit new digital content production collaborative models in both freelancers and media organizations. Learning Outcomes Enhance creative thinking and practicing in audiovisual production. Understand the digital formats of audio and video signals. Define the core technologies used for digital audiovisual content production and publishing. Comprehend the various characteristics of audiovisual productions in accordance with the publishing media (broadcast radio and TV channels, Web Radio and TV, etc.). Class/Learning activities Lectures, tools and services presentations, laboratory exercises and demos, content production projects. Workload Type of work Description Hours Lectures thirteen 1-hour lectures 13 Laboratory exercises thirteen 2-hour exercises 26 Laboratory preparation Study of material related to tools and services 26-39 Section projects 2 section projects (audio, video) 40-50 Final content production project Group work in  major production project 150-160 Total workload 255-288  Assessment Type of assessment Learning outcome Impact on final grade Date of assessment Participation in group  discussion 10% 1st-12rd week Laboratory exercises 20% 2nd – 9th week Section projects 30% 4th, 7th, 10th week Final project 40% 13th week Recommended Texts Vaughan, T. (2014). Multimedia: making it work. 9th Ed., McGraw-Hill Osborne Media. Owens, J. & Millerson, G. (2012). Video Production Handbook 5th Ed., Focal Press Miller, Carolyn Handler (2014). Digital storytelling: A creator’s guide to interactive entertainment, Taylor & Francis.

DIM 111 | Multimedia Journalism: Authoring for interactive media

Semester: A + B
ECTS: 10

Course Description Nowadays, there is a continuous evolution of contemporary Digital Journalism genres and associated informing services. Among others, Multimedia Journalism attempts to offer appealing storytelling through user-friendly interfaces that offer rich media experience, aiming at engaging the audience. The course aims at providing students the essential theoretical knowledge and technical skills on multimedia projects implementation and management, using state of the art production, editing and authoring techniques. Starting from the conception of a creative idea until the formulation of a technical project plan, basic terms and definitions along with production methodologies and development models are deployed. Emphasis is given to the specific characteristics and also to the medium that is suitable for each content type. The students work hands-on individually and in groups in the laboratory, with practical exercises that include animated material and interactive multimedia content and make it available through various technologies. These utilities may include the creation of user interfaces and interactive prototypes (mockups on Balsamiq Studios, InVision, Axure etc.), web design services (WordPress, Wix, etc.), interactive video authoring and publishing (YouTube, h5p.org, etc.), social networking (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram etc.) and others Course Objectives Explain the technological evolution by analysing content and application specifications. Examine the similarities and the differences along with the content production-distribution-consumption chain between traditional media, electronic mass communication (both analog and digital) and New Media Services (Web 2.0 and beyond). Analyse, understand and exploit new digital content production collaborative models in both freelancers and media organizations. Learning Outcomes Comprehend multimedia content production, pre- and post-processing tools, multimedia authoring and media assets integration. Understand multimedia application packaging and distribution strategies. Understanding the role of multimodal digital content and its metadata in the New Media landscape towards the transition to the Semantic Web (Web 3.0 and beyond). Acquire the demanded technological know-how and skills in order to fully exploit the potentials of New Media in digital content production, authoring, sharing, accessing and interacting, including augmented documentation through semantic tagging. Comprehend and adapt with the new digital content production roles in both media organizations and UGC models. Class/Learning activities Lectures, tools and services presentations, laboratory exercises and demos, multimedia production projects. Workload Type of work Description Hours Lectures thirteen 1-hour lectures 13 Laboratory exercises thirteen 2-hour exercises 26 Laboratory preparation Study of material related to tools and services 26-39 Section projects 2 section projects: 1) Designing & Prototyping, and 2) Media assets production / selection 40-50 Final multimedia production project Integrated multimedia production project, including authoring, publishing and dissemination 150-160 Total workload 255-288 Assessment Type of assessment Learning outcome Impact on final grade Date of assessment Participation in group discussion 10% 1st-12rd week Laboratory exercises 20% 2nd – 9th week Section projects 30% 4th, 7th, 10th week Final project 40% 13th week Recommended Bibliography Axure [highly interactive HTML prototype creation] Retrieved on 15 January 2021 from https://docs.axure.com/axure-rp/reference/getting-started-video/ Balsamiq [low-fidelity UI wireframing] Retrieved on 15 January 2021 from: https://balsamiq.com/learn/ InVision Studio [interactive prototyping tool] (N.D.). Master the power of InVision Studio. Retrieved on Feb. 1, 2020, from https://www.invisionapp.com/studio/learn Vaughan, T. (2014). Multimedia: making it work. 9th Ed., McGraw-Hill Osborne Media. Wix [web building /CMS platform] (N.D.). Wix help center. Retrieved on Feb. 1, 2017, from https://support.wix.com/en/

DIM 112 | Strategic Digital Marketing

Semester: A + B
ECTS: 10

Course Description Digitization has dynamically entered contemporary media landscape and the line between online and offline is becoming less distinct, for both consumers and businesses. Consumers are increasingly sophisticated and highly connected, and they seek products and information personalized, relevant and convenient across all traditional and digital channels. The present course aims to outline the essentials of marketing theory and offers a structured approach to identifying, understanding and solving marketing problems. It describes how consumer behavior has been developed in the digital era, discusses consumer buying incentives and analyzes segmentation, targeting and positioning strategies. Moreover, the course examines marketing research methods and customer relationship management strategies and discusses how Internet has transformed the interaction between customers and organizations. Branding strategies as well as the key elements of marketing mix strategy are described. Finally, the course explains how to evaluate and measure digital success, developing an understanding of the KPIs and metrics, while digital tools and tactics are explored, focusing on how they align and contribute to the overall business strategy. Course Objectives The main objectives of the course are to: Describe marketing operations by examining issues such as product policies, pricing, marketing communications, distribution channels and marketing research Familiarize students with the components of a strategic marketing plan Familiarize students with processes involved in formulating, implementing and controlling a strategic marketing program Examine current trends and challenges in strategic marketing and how organizations adapt to them Discuss the importance of marketing research and explain its contribution to analyse markets, customers and stakeholders Explore how marketing interacts with other levels of strategy and with other functional departments within an organization Analyze marketing issues in media industries Explain how new technologies and digitization have changed the way we market Discuss the use of digital marketing frameworks and theories in developing digital strategies Learning Outcomes After completion of the course students are expected to be able to: Summarize the key characteristics and major dimensions of complex marketing environment Indicate and utilize strategic opportunities through internal and external analysis Inquire and interpret consumer behaviour towards strategic marketing planning and decision-making Utilize strategic planning tools and apply strategic models Develop and critically appraise integrated marketing strategies in a wide range of industries and organizations Demonstrate the key theoretical marketing concepts to develop a strategic marketing plan with appropriate and measurable strategic marketing goals Evaluate and appraise strategic marketing decisions and success in relation to business goals Class/Learning activities Faculty Lectures and Guest-Lectures Seminars Directed and Background Reading Academic Paper Discussion Case Study Analysis Individual Project Student-led Presentations Workload Type of work Description Hours Lectures Thirteen 3-hours lectures 39 Weekly Activities Organization and coordination of group work 20-25 Independent study Study of compulsory and optional literature 40-45 Research Case study 35-40 Individual Project Written assignment 1. Essay (4500 words) 2. Student-led Presentation     120-140 Total Workload 254 – 289 Assessment Type of Assessment Learning Outcome Impact on Final  Grade Date of Assessment Individual Project       1-7           80% 12th – 13th week In-Class Activities / Participation 1-7         20%       Regularly Reading Required Reading Classnotes Chernev, A.& Kotler, P. (2018) Strategic Marketing Management, 9th ed., Cerebellum Press. Chafey, D. (2016) Digital Marketing, 7th ed., Pearson. Recommended Reading Cravens, D. W. (2012) Strategic Marketing, McGraw-Hill Education. Kingsnorth, S. (2016) Digital Marketing Strategy: An Integrated Approach to Online Marketing, Kogan Page. Academic Journals European Journal of Marketing Journal of Strategic Marketing Journal of Digital & Social Media Marketing Journal of Digital Marketing International Journal of Internet Marketing and Advertising Journal of Business Market Management Journal of Business Research

Optional

MCC 400 | Communication Research Methods

Semester: A
ECTS: NO

Course Description This unit covers in detail the practice of research methods in the field of communication. Students will become familiar with developing the research question(s), formulating the hypotheses of their study, selecting participants and instruments. Moreover, they will explore the various designs that are used in quantitative (e.g. experimental and quasi experimental design, correlational design, surveys) and qualitative (e.g. interviews, focus groups, participant observations) research.  During these sessions students will learn how to select the appropriate research design depending on the area they wish to study and the analysis that is required for each set of data (quantitative or qualitative).  A great emphasis is also given to the ethical issues in research methods. Course Objectives Provide students the knowledge and experience to became informed consumers of scientific research Provide students with the skills and knowledge necessary to carry out a research project Provide students with a reflexive and critical attitude towards research. Learning Outcomes Understand the issues involved in the design of research in the field of communication Understand the strengths and weaknesses of each research methodology Formulate a clear research question and be able to write a research proposal Select the appropriate research technique to answer specific research questions in the field of communication Communicate and disseminate the research output Class/Learning activities Lectures, workshops, group work, in-class presentations, literature study, written assignments Workload Type of work Description Hours Lectures Thirteen 3-hours lectures 39 Independent study Study of compulsory and optional literature 30-40 Group Research Small scale research 55-65 Written assignments Literature review (1.500-2.000 words)Research proposal (2.000-2.500 words) 110-120 Presentations In-class oral presentations 20-30 Total workload 254-294 Assessment Type of assessment Learning outcome Impact on final grade Date of assessment Participation in group work and discussion 1-2 10% Regularly Presentation 5 10% 8th -12th week Group research 2-4 20% 6th – 8th week Literature review 2-4 30% 8th week Research proposal 2-5 30% 13th week Required Reading Creswell, J. W. (2014).  Qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods approaches (4rth ed.). Thousand Oak: CA, Sage. Merrigan, G., & Huston, C. L. (2008). Communication research methods. Oxford University. Silverman, D. (2010). Doing qualitative research (3rd ed.). London: Sage. Additional Recommended Reading Babbie, E. (2013). The basics of social research (6th ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Cengage Learning. Baxter, L., & Babbie, E. (2004). The basics of communication research. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Thomson Learning Field, A. (2013). Discovering statistics using IBM SPSS Statistics (4rth ed). Thousand Oakes, CA: Sage Lindlof, T. R., & Taylor, B. C. (2008). Qualitative communication research methods (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Mertens, D. M. (2015). Research and evaluation in education and psychology: Integrating diversity with quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods (4rth ed.). Thousand Oak: CA, Sage.

MCC 402 | Qualitative Research Methods in Communication

Semester: B
ECTS: 10

Course description The course aims to introduce students to the conceptualization, design, and difficulties of qualitative research methods used in media and communication studies, including participant observation and digital ethnography, depth interviews, focus groups, historical analysis, discourse, thematic, visual and content analysis. Course objectives Develop an attitude of exploring inquiries, innovation and creativity, concerning the fields of journalism and popular culture Develop critical thinking skills to assess ideas, acquiring research skills, synthesizing knowledge across disciplines and applying academic knowledge to personal experiences throughout the media world. Develop research abilities through implementing qualitative methodological tools for investigating either the production/content of mediated messages or the audience responses to them. Learning outcomes Familiarize with the logic, design, and pitfalls of qualitative research in media and communication Apply general principles of qualitative analysis to accomplish and evaluate research in media and communication Associate major techniques of qualitative analysis to concrete research topics of interest. Class/Learning activities Lectures, group work, in-class presentations, literature study, written assignments.

MCC 401 | Dissertation Research & Writing Skills

Semester: B
ECTS: 10

Course Description This course is designed to help graduate students with academic writing by developing the skills necessary to produce high quality work in term-papers and the end-of-year dissertation. The lectures, tasks and activities are richly varied, ranging from small-scale language points to studying the discourse of journalism, media, and communication. Topics to be dealt with include: writing expository and argumentative texts, writing summaries, introductions and conclusions, discussion of data, citing and attributing sources, researching and creating bibliographies. Students receive feedback on their writing and are expected to engage in self-editing and peer-reviewing. The course is highly recommended for students with little experience in writing academic papers and for those who need to brush up their skills in academic writing. Learning Outcomes By the end of this course students should be able to: Understand the features of academic writing Understand the basics of sentence, paragraph, and argument structure Use and evaluate sources, and compile a bibliography Use punctuation, in-text references, quotations, and footnotes Avoid plagiarism Write summaries/introductions/conclusions Write academic essays and their end-of-year dissertation Understand and participate in the processes of self-editing and peer-reviewing. Workload Type of work Description Hours Lectures Thirteen 3-hour lectures 39 Independent study Study of academic discourse 30 Written assignments Optional tasks on language points (grammar, vocabulary, style)  and on various types of academic writing 60 Total workload 129  Assessment Type of assessment Learning outcome Impact on final grade Date of assessment The course carries no formal assessment – – –